12 Day(ngers) of Christmas – Day 6

Dog

On the 6th day of Christmas, my owner accidentally gave to me … 

Leftovers 

If there is any food left over at Christmas, be careful to dispose of it well and keep it out of the reach of your four-legged friend. Not only may the food include ingredients toxic to dogs, mould in leftovers (including yoghurt, bread and cheese) can produce toxins that cause rapid onset convulsions in dogs.

 

Cat

On the 6th day of Christmas, my owner accidentally gave to me… 

Mistletoe

The plant of love, Mistletoe, is as big a part of Christmas as Santa, but did you know it’s also a vicious parasite that maintains its green colour by sucking nutrients out of trees? On top of that it is highly toxic to cats and dogs and, if eaten, can cause vomiting, diarrhoea, laboured breathing, shock, and even death from cardiovascular collapse.

 

Rabbit

On the 6th day of Christmas, my owner accidentally gave to me… 

Salty snacks

Salty snacks are especially dangerous and if a rabbit ingests too much salt then there could be fatal consequences.

12 Day(ngers) of Christmas – Day 5

Dog

On the 5th day of Christmas, my owner accidentally gave to me … 

Macadamia nuts

Macadamia nuts can cause lethargy, increased body temperature, tremor, lameness and stiffness in dogs.

 

Cat

On the 5th day of Christmas, my owner accidentally gave to me… 

Mistletoe

The plant of love, Mistletoe, is as big a part of Christmas as Santa, but did you know it’s also a vicious parasite that maintains its green colour by sucking nutrients out of trees? On top of that it is highly toxic to cats and dogs and, if eaten, can cause vomiting, diarrhoea, laboured breathing, shock, and even death from cardiovascular collapse.

 

Rabbit

On the 5th day of Christmas, my owner accidentally gave to me… 

Festive Treats

Don’t leave any sweets lying about or else your buns will help themselves to a potentially dangerous feast. Coffee tables are probably high enough for your bunny to jump up to help themselves to your favourite festive offerings.

12 Day(ngers) of Christmas – Day 4

Dog

On the 4th day of Christmas, my owner accidentally gave to me … 

Alcohol

Alcohol can have a similar effect in dogs as it does in their owners when drunk in excess. They can become wobbly and drowsy and in severe cases, there is a risk of low body temperature, low blood sugar and coma. Dogs may help themselves to any unattended alcohol left lying around over Christmas, so ensure it’s always out of their reach.

 

Cat

On the 4th day of Christmas, my owner accidentally gave to me… 

Snow globes

Cat owners should be wary of snow globes. Some of these festive ornaments can contain ethylene glycerol, commonly known as antifreeze, which is highly toxic to pets. If the ornament breaks and the liquid spills out, there’s a real risk your cat could lick it up or swallow it whilst grooming – if it’s on their fur – and become critically ill. Be sure to check what chemicals your snow globe contains and keep it well out of the reach of any curious cats.

 

Rabbit

On the 4th day of Christmas, my owner accidentally gave to me… 

Candles

Keep all candles and open flames high up and out of the way of your rabbits. Cold ashes can be as equally as harmful as they are very caustic when combined with water.

12 Day(ngers) of Christmas – Day 3

Dog

On the 3rd day of Christmas, my owner accidentally gave to me … 

Onions (and garlic, leeks, shallots and chives)

Onions, garlic, leeks, shallots and chives all belong to the Allium species of plants and can cause toxicity, whether uncooked or cooked. Initially there can be vomiting and diarrhoea but the main effect is damage to red blood cells, resulting in anaemia. This may not be apparent for several days after ingestion.

 

Cat

On the 3rd day of Christmas, my owner accidentally gave to me… 

Christmas lights

Christmas lights can pose a real danger to cats if they decide to chew on any electrical wiring. Ensure you cover any exposed wires leading to the tree with plastic or cardboard tubes, and switch lights off at the mains when you’re not around to supervise your cat. Battery powered LED lights are also a good option instead.

 

Rabbit

On the 3rd day of Christmas, my owner accidentally gave to me… 

Gift wrap

Gift wrap and sellotape are not safe for your rabbit to eat but some of the more mischievous bunnies may be drawn to these playthings. As a substitute give them hay wrapped in brown paper. Your rabbit will love unwrapping they paper to get to the yummy hay.

National senior pet week – Lifespan

Lifespan

People often ask, ‘what is the average lifespan for my pet?’, and it can vary quite considerably, but what we do see is that many pets are living longer lifespans than 20 or 30 years ago. This is due to many factors, but certainly advances in veterinary technology with imaging and blood tests have allowed vets to gain more information about disease processes, and advanced our understanding of illnesses so that we can treat quite complex cases successfully, with the aim of providing good quality of life at the forefront of our care.
There are many more safe and effective medicines to treat common conditions like heart disease or arthritis and it is even possible to surgically remove cataracts now in pets. The best way to ensure a long , healthy lifespan for your pet is to feed a good diet, but not overfeed, provide good quality, regular and appropriate exercise for your pet, groom them regularly, and keep up to date with vaccinations and parasite control. It really does pay off in their later years.

Senior dog week – Changes in your dog

Changes

Our pets change as they get older, a few grey hairs may appear or they may be content to spend more time snoozing, and this is all quite normal. However there are some changes which should not be ignored, as they can signal some disease processes and our main message to owners of older pets is, get advice, as many diseases if diagnosed early can be controlled and allow your pet to enjoy good quality of life.
Some changes to be alert for are:
  • Increase in thirst – are you topping up the drinking water more often, or do you see your pet drinking in other places often?
  • Loss of house cleanliness – are you having  to clear up after a pet who has been house trained since they were a puppy or kitten?
  • Change in appearance of faeces – different volumes, shape, colour?
  • Loss of weight, or seeming to get ‘fat’ around the middle?
  • Less energy on walks?
This is not an exhaustive list, and really any alteration to what you know is normal for your pet should be a good reason to get an appointment with your vet. Never feel you are ‘wasting our time’ or making a fuss’ just because you can’t decide what is wrong, to a certain extent that is our job!

Laparoscopic Keyhole spay

What is a Laparoscopic spay?                         

A laparoscopic spay is an alternative to the traditional method. It is less invasive and allows faster recovery time.

In a laparoscopic spay, your female dog will have her ovaries removed with a camera and vessel sealing device through a keyhole incision (ovariectomy). If your dog were to have a traditional spay, this involves an operation whereby a long incision is made on the midline of the tummy. The uterus and the ovaries are stitched with thread and are removed through this larger hole. The technical name for this operation is ovariohysterectomy

lap-spay-diagram
 

 What are the benefits?

The main benefits of a laparoscopic spay are less pain and a faster healing time than the traditional spay operation.

benefits-of-lap-spay

Are Laparoscopic spays more expensive than traditional spays?

Laparoscopic surgery costs more than traditional neutering because it is carried out by a specialist surgeon and requires specialist equipment. Laparoscopic surgery equipment is also costly to purchase and maintain, it takes extra training, experience and a higher level of surgical expertise.

The cost for Laparoscopic keyhole spay surgery is £495.00 all inclusive, regardless of the size of your pet. This includes a post-operative consultation and all medication relating to the procedure.

Can all vets perform Laparoscopic spays?

Laparoscopic surgery requires both specialist equipment and an experienced surgeon to carry out the procedure. Compared to human laparoscopic procedures, a very small portion of pet surgery in the UK is performed laparoscopically. We use a very experienced vet who has over 10 years’ experience and extra qualifications who comes to our practice every month to perform the surgery.

Who will be performing the Laparoscopic spay for my dog?

Laparoscopic spays are carried out by Dugie Gemmill BVMS CERTVR GPCERT (ENDO) MRCVS of Vetscopic.

Dugie was among the first vets in the UK to obtain a brand new qualification in the field, GPCert(Endo), in 2009. Having ten years of laparoscopic experience, Dugie established a surgical consultancy as VetScopic to offer procedures such as laparoscopic neutering to the wider pet owning public at their own veterinary practices. To find out more about Dugie and Vetscopic, please click here 

What do our clients say about the procedure at Orchard House Vets?

” I have two dogs who I booked in to be spayed by laparoscopic keyhole surgery as we had been told this was easier on the dogs in terms of discomfort and recovery. On the morning of the procedure the staff were great and fully explained everything that would be happening. One of my dogs gets stressed very easily and the staff were great with her and made sure she was kept calm. The surgery went well and I was able to take them home the same day, once the staff talked me through how best to keep them comfortable through the night. The after care was also great with follow up appointments to ensure they were healing well. I would highly recommend this procedure for spaying your animals, as my dogs were almost back to normal with no signs of any pain within a couple of days.” – Miss Irving.

How can I book an appointment for this procedure for my dog?

We would strongly advise a pre-operative consultation with one of our vets before booking the Laparoscopic keyhole spay. You can do this by either booking an appointment online (click the link below) or give us a call on 01434 607677.

We will happily answer any further questions that you might have, please email us at admin@orchardhousevets.com